Quick Tip: Resolve a Local HTTP 403 Forbidden Warning in a Nagios Installation

After installing Nagios some weeks ago to monitor my local infrastructure, all was well with the exception of a persistent warning logged by Nagios against the local HTTP service.  Specifically, I was seeing a 403 Forbidden warning being returned by Apache (pictured below).
Nagios-Core

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Quick Tip: Easily Set SELinux Enforcement Levels in CentOS 6

This post, like any other dealing with altering a security mechanism, should (and will) begin with a warning to NOT do this in a production environment. Obligatory bold warning text:
SELinux is a major security component in any RHEL-based Linux distribution and should never be disabled in a production environment without extensive consideration and forethought as it can seriously compromise system security. It’s best practice to work with an application vendor to ensure the application works with SELinux if it’s going to be placed in production. Now we return to the regularly scheduled Blog post.

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Quick Tip: Pass a Command to an SSH Session as an Argument

Today’s Quick Tip isn’t necessarily an easier way of accomplishing a task, it’s simply a time saver I find myself using often. SSH is a fabulous tool for administrating remote systems via a remote shell, but you may not always need a fully interactive environment to accomplish a given task. Let’s take for example restarting a service. In order to restart a service via a traditional SSH session you must connect to the machine, restart the service with either the service command or /etc/init.d/, and disconnect. Using today’s Quick Tip, that entire process can be wrapped up into a single command. First, we’ll look at the basic method of passing the command then show how a service can be restarted in this way.
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